Posts

Showing posts from April, 2014

Doves spotted hard at it ...

Image
Spotted Doves (Streptopelia chinensis) making hard work of it near the Tyto carpark. Looks like the male needs a calmer sutra.

Locks seal the deal for young lovers

Image
Locks seal the deal for young lovers declaring their togetherness in Ingham these days.

Padlocks bearing names and dates adorn trysting spot along the Tyto Wetland raised walkway.

Wonder how many pairings will outlast their metal symbols?

One of above images taken soon after TC Ita poured through the town. 

Bonus flood picture looking southwest from the walkway.


After taking terns, look to a master

Image
Frustrating morning begging White-winged Black Terns (Chlidonias leucopterus) to stop mucking about at fishing and hover slowly above my head at the edge of tidal lagoon today. The Whiskered Terns (Chlidonias hybrida) were no more helpful. Above, best of a bad 300 images.

Slightly better bird-in-flight, Yellow Honeyeater (Lichenostomus flavus) about to join mate in Tyto recently. Hoped to get pair in action but other bird ducked behind mass of twiggery.

And here's what we all hope for, from a master

Python perks up after pick up

Image
Picked up small Carpet Python in passing along the Wallaman Falls road yesterday. Almost trod on snake after stepping out of the Troopy to check birdlife near the 10km sign pointing to the falls. It was coiled almost vertically and showing mostly belly among Cyclone Ita debris. Thinking it dead or injured, gave a gentle prod. Head emerged cautiously and snake started to move off slowly. So, picture from ground level ...


... and a bit of fun with my new friend. Which found sunny spot near the sign and was still stretched out ignoring my farewell 40 minutes later.


And from earlier trip to the falls, Victoria's Riflebird (Ptiloris victoriae), female or immature male. Poor shot, but species hard to find since Cyclone Yasi blasted through more than three years ago. There's a much better imagehere

Meet Mr Nutty, a triller diller

Image
Meet Mr Nutty, a male Varied Triller (Lalage leucomela) for weeks now daily besieging mirrors and windows on my Landcruiser, trying to drive off his so persistent rivals. Not even a short spell trapped inside the Troopy changed his behaviour. Even his more sensible mate occasionally joins, adding in passing a bit more poop to the mirrors. But it's taken till today to get a few pictures.

We'll sit it out amongst all the green stuff

Image
Go to a cyclone shelter? Nope, we'll sit it out amongst all the green wet stuff, thanks very much. Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) male and junior in pre-Ita sunshine on front lagoon at Tyto Wetlands.

But Ita's done what Yasi couldn't: sprung an old leak in my old caravan ceiling. Hah, we laugh at moist lino. A few more hours gusting and and Ita will be pouring south of Ingham and all should be well, if somewhat flooded here and there.

Are you lookin' at me?

Image
Are you lookin' at me?

Are you lookin' at me?

Ok, you're not lookin' at me
Brown Falcon (Falco berigora) at Orient Station.

Birdwings mean butterflies and umbrellas are trees

Image
Good morrow, Moss and Jarvi. Are you sitting up straight? Study carefully. There may be a test later in the year.

Ornithoptera priamus, known as the common green birdwing, Cape York Birdwing, Priam's Birdwing or Northern Birdwing, above Wallaman Falls on Friday.
Schefflera actinophylla is native to tropical rainforests and gallery forests in Australia, New Guinea and Java. Common names include Queensland umbrella tree, octopus tree and amate.

Wallaman Falls is Australia's longest single drop waterfall, located in the Girringun National Park – the largest national park within the world heritage listed Wet Tropics Rainforest of North Queensland and one of the oldest continual surviving rainforests on Earth.

Colourful adulthood to come

Image
Immature Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher (Tanysiptera sylvia) hints at
colours to come with adulthood as it shows out briefly on lower slopes
beside road up to Wallaman Falls. Quest for older birds continued
yesterday without any further sightings.

Less colourful but more reliably present, Pale-yellow Robin (Tregellasia
capito) turns up to keep an eye on things.

Also usually present in numbers but not often popping out from high cover
on the upper slopes, Brown Gerygone (Gerygone mouki).